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. thomas e perez currently oversees the civil rights division and to no one's surprise he has a long history of controversy. and don't take my word for it. when he was floated as a potential pick, jay adams had this to say about his former colleague when he spoke "the great one" mark levin. >> tell us about this fellow perez before he went into the justice department. >> well, he's a radical's radical, used to be maryland, and worked with the-- he's an extreme radical, anti-business, a racialist to the core. >> can you imagine this man in charge of the labor department, the total leapt. >> totally lawless, this is a man for whom law is a nuisance. >> joining me now with the reaction from americans for justice, jay sekulow and congressman dennis kucinich. you didn't like when the black panthers were outside with the batons the polling place in philly, you didn't like that. >> that case didn't have anything to do with secretary designate perez. >> actually, it did. the issue came up with the new black panther case in which the inspector general reviewed the case and supported the accus
leads the doj's civil rights division and could wind up being the next u.s. labor secretary. a cabinet member who will play a key role in the the president's efforts to raise the minimum wage and reform immigration laws among many other responsibilities, but with at least one former doj attorney describing mr. perez as a quote, radical radical who views the law as, quote, a nuisance, you can bet there's a fight over this man's nomination may get intense. chris stirewalt is our fox news digital power editor on power play.com live. tom perez's tenure heading up to the doj has been controversial to say the least, but he is beloved by those on the left as someone who embodies virtually all the principles they stand for. what does it say that president obama is proceeding with that nomination despite some of the controversies that emerged when he they floated the trial balloon earlier? >> well, in washington we can tell a lot more about somebody's intent by what they do than what they say. what we've heard a lot said of the white house of late is that they're interested in reaching out to r
that could make a contentious battle. perez who heads the civil rights division at the justice department will have questions to answer, but the doj's decision to drop that now infamous voter intimidation case against the new black panther party, as well as a case headed to the supreme court that could have struck down his legal theories on racial discrimination, for more we're joined by editorial board member mary kissle and political diary editor jason riley. mary, you broke the story a year ago about the involvement in the st. paul case, we've since discovered a lot more details thanks to your digging. why did perez get himself involved in in case? >> well, the city of st. paul, minnesota was challenging, a theory of racial discrimination that tom perez and the justice department were using to accuse banks of discrimination, and so, he feared that if the court struck down this particular rule, that he would have to stop doing that, it would cut off a big source of funding, actually, for the justice department. >> so he leaned on st. paul to drop the case and they'd been litigating for
. >> this is a big historic moment. >> this is a basic civil rights issue. >> our colleague, our teachers, our soldiers, our friends. >> can you imagine the next presidential campaign, a republican candidate saying flat-out, i am for gay marriage? >> i could. >> immigration makes us stronger. it is part of what makes this such a dynamic country. >> no immigration reform is going to happen unless republicans in the house sign on to it. >> the time's come for comprehensive, sensible immigration reform. >> we are going to have a vote on assault weapons and we're going to have a vote on background checks. >> he can't spend enough of his $27 billion to try to impose his will on the american public. >> 90% of the public want something. >> i mean, it's insane the stuff he says. >> this isn't about wayne lapierre. it's about the public wanting to be safe on their streets. ♪ you don't need a weatherman to know it's where the wind blows ♪ >> it's a busy and wintery monday on the east coast. congress is on spring break as lawmakers return to their districts where they're likely to face constituents r
to marry, even from imprisoned felons. this is a basic civil rights issue. i don't think this is the kind of issue that will divide the court the way other issues divide the court. >> asia mills and jimmy la sylvia, director of go proud. good to see you both. >> thanks for having me. >> frank bruni said the final chapter of this story has in fact been written. the question isn't whether there will be a happy ending, the question is when. asia, is he right? >> absolutely. the tide has completely shifted on the as you announced earlier, the polling on marriage equality. we know this is not a matter of if, it is a matter of when. the states are moving this direction, it is a matter of time. >> even with the politicians, you see this move. jimmy, i was thinking about the fact that gay rights supporters weren't welcome at cpac, and you know who was, phyllis shaf lee, credited with turning back the equal rights amendment when in the '70s it seemed like a done deal. is it possible the celebrations are premature? >> i can tell you i agree, we have reached a tipping point on this. i was part of a
a two-state solution, the president asserted that forging a lasting peace is a matter of civil rights. couching it the broader question of what it means to be a democracy. a return to the signature themes of the 2008 campaign and the early days of his presidency. as he outlined in cairo in 2009, the president began by affirming america's respect and its commitment. >> i've come here to cairo to seek a new beginning. between the united states and muslims around the world. one based on mutual interest and mutual respect. so long as there is a united states of america. [ speaking foreign language ] >> you are not alone. >> as he did in his landmark 2008 speech on race, the president argued that despite our differences, it is hope and the fundamental optimism about the next generation, that bonds us together. >> we may not look the same and may not have come from the same place, but we all want to move in the same direction. towards a better future for our children. and our grandchildren. >> but before i, before i came here, i met with a group of young palestinians. i honestly believe tha
, an historic civil rights march. the reverend martin luther king jr. led 25,000 marchers to the st state capitol to protest the denial of voting rights to blacks. >>> happy birthday to aretha franklin. she turns 71. >>> here's a look at what's coming up on the "today" show. former penn state assistant coach jerry sandusky speaks out from behind bars for the first time since being convicted of child abuse. and usher talks about joining "the voice" ahead of tonight's season premiere. a shout-out to knbc and our friends at "today in l.a." last friday i was out there visiting, and they couldn't have been any more welcoming. great morning show and great morning team. thanks for the 70-degree weather. we need that. right, bill? keep it on this channel. i'm richard lui along with bill karins. thanks for watching "early today," just your first stop of the day on your nbc station. have a great monday. . . . >>> new this morning, the search for a swimmer who disappeared off the coast of half moon bay continues. we'll have the latest details next. >>> plus, people all over in the bay area getting r
america's civil rights leader, who was assassinated trying to fight for civil rights in honor of the israeli leader, yitzhak rabin, who was assassinated trying to fight for peace. it's both a symbolic way of the president saying, i deeply understand the israeli struggle, and i also deeply believe that it's worth sacrifice and hard work to continue to fight for peace. quite a way to end his trip. >> quite a way, indeed. jessica yellin, live this morning, thanks for being with us. ahead on "starting point," the nra turning its sights on a new new york gun control law. is this measure unconstitutional? we're going to get reaction from aurora shooting survivor stephen barton. >>> and a 15-year-old girl is trapped when burglars enter her home. >> hey, bring the bucket over here. >> okay, don't talk. >> bring it over here. >> how she survived in her own words. next. you're watching "starting point." [ male announcer ] rita's suitcase got lost a few months back. hi. i got a call today that you guys found my suitcase. we don't have it. you don't even know my name. [ sniffs ] are you w
's the right thing to do. it's a civil rights issue. it's not just gay people who want you to be for marriage equali equality. it's a broad segment of the electorate. if you look at that poll the majority of catholics are for marriage equality. a majority of -- the minority communities are for marriage equality. i just think it is more and more a basic civil rights issue that people are going to expect you to be on the right side of. >> steve, thanks so much. good to see you. >> good to see you. >>> in south carolina today the first test of former governor mark sanford's attempt at a post scandal political comeback. sanford running against 15 other republican candidates for congress. in 2009 you'll remember he stepped down as governor after admitting an extra marital affair with an argentinian woman. among his opponents ted turner's son teddy. the primary is expected to go to a round. i had enough of feeling embarrassed about my skin. [ designer ] enough of just covering up my moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪ [ spa lady ] i started enbrel. it's clinically p
to embrace civil rights. it's important to young voters. republican, independent and democrat. no, not one person was willing to take on the issue of gay marriage, which is, of course, the central issue they were implying is driving some young, a lot of younger voters in this country. so they have massive problems. the other problem is that when you look at this report, what they're trying to do, and jonathan martin in "politico" wrote a nice piece about this today. they're suggesting structural changes that will make it much harder for insurgent candidates like the rand pauls or the rick santorums to challenge for the nomination by shortening the process by condensing, by aggregating primaries so that you have to cover a lot more territory. by eliminating caucuses and conventions as a means of nominating candidates by a state. all of those things would give establishment candidates a much better chance to win the nomination and may give the republican party a better chance to win a national election. but they're courting a rebellion among their own troops and you saw some of that at cpac
to be his labor secretary. perez heads the justice department's civil rights division. he has been criticized, though, by some conservatives who think he's too partisan, but he is considered a civil rights hero by others. if confirmed, perez would be the only latino in obama's cabinet. >>> and take a look here at this actor who is playing the role of satan in the history channel miniseries, "the bible." all right. so if you think it looks anything like president obama, you are not alone. social media blew up after the scene aired. there were nearly 20,000 tweets containing the words obama and satan. the producer of the show is denying that it was intentional, saying, quote, this is utter nonsense. the actor who played satan is a highly acclaimed moroccan actor, and he has previously played parts of several biblical epics, long before barack obama was elected as our president. the history channel weighed in, too, releasing this statement. quote, history channel has the highest respect for president obama. it's unfortunate that anyone made this false connection. the silver lining in
, a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally growing up in far flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a ome. of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibility in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle just like previous generations. it means us working through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed, i may not get there with you, but i want you to know that we as a people will get to the promised land. so just as joshua carried on after moses, the work goes on for all of you. the joshua generation. for justice, and digget, for opportunity and freedom. for the jewish peopl
to face its biggest legal challenge. a civil rights group is taking the police to court and claims the so-called stop and frisk policy targets minorities. >> in this east new york city neighborhood, crime and poverty are rampant but many young men say it's the new york police department they fear the most. >> how are you doing? >> i'm cool. >> all right, all right, all right. >> in fact, some were afraid to give their last names when describing their dealings with police. >> what's going on, leo? >> all right. how are you doing? >> i've had guns pointed out on me just based on the fact of my appearance, you know. stop and frisk, numerous times in one day, never find anything. it's just ongoing harassment, it seems. >> david has always been stopped and searched or frisked in his neighborhood of manhattan. >> it's scary, you know. when it's happening, it's embarrassing. the fear is always there. >> it's an issue i've been dealing with since i was 15, and it hurts. >> he is one of the people now suing the police over their stop and search tactics which have been well-documented by neighborho
a confirmation fight. tom perez is labor secretary he heads the justice department civil rights division. louisiana senator david vittert said today he will block the nomination because of how the department enforce its state's voting rights laws. he he claims the feds were more interested in registering welfare recipients than removing ineligible voters from the roles. white house says he is enormously qualified be labor secretary. a week after judge shot down plans to control sugary soda sizes. today the mayor announced a proposal that would require stores to keep all toe tobacco products out of sight. it's reportedly an attempt to cut underaged smoking and tobacco use. business owners would have to keep all of it in a drawer or something or under the counter, behind a curtain. no other city or state has such law although canada and some european nations do. remember, the mayor has already spearheaded moves to ban smoking in public places as well as bans on transfats and that soda thing. he has also been a vocal supporter of stricter gun control measures. republican leaders say their p
right now and heads up the civil rights division and president obama apparently pleased with him and wanting him to head over to head up the labor department and the wall street journal had a piece today that talked about how, quote, political muscle undermind the rule of law under mr. perez's civil rieghts division. in simple terms, what is the allegation that mr. perez did? >> one of the allegations is that he interfered and cost the american taxpayers 180 million dollars by getting a case dismissed where he didn't want to face the supreme court decision and gave up two very valid cases again, 180 million dollars of taxpayer money in st. paul. this was unprecedented. it had been set for additional this nominee has been expressed as not having been candid in his testimony. candid is it kind of one of the funny words in politics that means he didn't tell the whole truth. this is also somebody who refused to do his fundamental job which is to fully prosecute voter intimidation that fell under his watch. these are just some of the areas of concern that i think that senators have an
from imprisoned felons. this is a basic civil rights issue and i don't think it's the issue that divides the court. >> joining me now, patricia and head of the supreme court practice. jonathan turley. hello to both of you. welcome. >> hi, alex. >> patricia, i'll begin with you as -- well, let's talk about in terms of prop 8, what we heard just there, correct, i mean, the right to mary already, has it been well-established? >> well, the right to marry is but what the court hasn't grappled with is what is the definition of marriage and that, as we know, is the issue hotly contested in this case and what they will be confronting and in particular what is the role of the courts in that, the role of the states, the role of the federal constitution. so there's much for them to grapple with still. >> jonathan, breakdown for the viewers, if you will, the key issues here for each case. name one key issue for each of them. >> well, first of all, on the threshold level, one is doma, the statute of the defense of marriage act that has formed a discrimination against those who have same-
fraud or fraud on wall street or public corruption or civil-rights abuses and make certain that we prioritize and make sure we are focused on the greatest threats to the american public and then to the extent toere is a determination as what the ultimate resolution is, that's up to the judge's. >> thank you. i appreciate his question. what we're going to do is introduce a bill and i will ask your comments on it, after the recess. it will be bipartisan, it will be the two of us, to set up a national commission made up of expertsrison particularly in the state's, many of them very conservative had to responde to the prison crowding more from an economic issue than any other. it will be bipartisan. we're looking for a chairman of stature or somebody who can take a year to come back and report. i think our present system is dysfunctional in the sense that very few people are working in the prisons. the prison industry program has been decimated partly because of congress. we have tried to get the bureau of prisons to adopt programs to allow them to make products that are no longer made
to the base by habeas lawyers and activists, those working for civil rights. they want to choke information out of guantanamo because it's all bad. >> michael: it seems also, colonel davis, not only is the information bad but this is not been prioritized. i'm wondering, colonel davis how does this become a priority for the president and the administration? it seems that it's a forgotten thing. is this hunger strike going to work? >> i doubt that it will. there have been hunger strikers before. there have been suicide that didn't get a lot of attention. if you look at the drone program. today the president or the white house is rumored to get the ca out of the drone business because the public is in such an uproar. so it's going to take the public standing up and saying, look, this is not in our interest to waste this money on guantanamo, and we need to close it down. >> michael: colonel morris davis, colonel david remes. thank you for sharing your expertise and insights with us. when we come back, we've been talking about guantanamo for 11, 12 years now we still can't seem to talk about gun
citizens. they could vote. way ahead on civil rights, proposing federal anti lynching loss. he spoke out to irish groups, jewish groups while at the same time that that evidence should be made american which is something that is clearly missing from our immigration debate. lou: the idea of going from melting pot to a cultural selig we never quite bring everybody together. that's like to be a very big issue. let me get your thoughts. are we going to see comprehensive immigration reform? >> i think not. when people see the price tag, the need to understand that -- well, coolidge understood. i'm engaged to marry an immigrant. nothing against immigrants. who wanted to be american. lou: fully assimilated. >> says. they are going to be -- lou: what is the point. >> what is the point. good to have you with us. highly recommend. on sale now on line in bookstores. it to have year. up next, president obama, israeli prime minister. they are really b.f. half. good friends. the cape for taking that up and more. here next. ♪ ♪ lou: joining as now, the "a-team," author, radio talk-show host, fox ne
as important, a level playing field. we will ensure regard for civil liberties and civil rights. today, we look to our prime minister of forming his parliamentary government in the next few weeks. with on his consultations parliament's come up which is an extension of the same constitutional process that resulted in his nomination. i am very proud of this process. what we are seeing is the third way in the middle east. we now enjoy the benefits of the arab summer for us all. we have to roll up our sleeves. it will be a very bumpy and difficult road. but i look forward to the future. again, mr. president, thank you to jordan. i hope your success will continue in your visit. >> thank you very much. it is great to be back in jordan. i am glad to speak with my friend king abdullah. thank you to the people of jordan for their extreme warmth and hospitality that i remember well from my first visit as a senator. that thing i mainly remember when i came here was his majesty personally drove me to the airport. i will not tell you how fast he was going, but secret service could not keep up. nevertheless,
that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations, this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally, growing up in far-flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a home. [ applause ] of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle, just like previous generations. it means us working through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed, i may not get there with you, but i want you to know that we as a people will get to the promiseland. so just -- [ applause ] -- so just as joshua carried on after moses, the work goes on for all of you, the joshua generation. for justice and dignity, for opportunity and freedo
we're going to win 5-4. i think this is a basic civil rights issue. i don't think this is a kind of issue that will divide the court the way some other issues divide the court. >> do you think it's possible the court makes a decision that doesn't resolve the right question? in other words, it doesn't resolve whether there's a right to marry? >> they could. there's a technical issue called standing that's raised here and the court could decide that the defendants don't have standing. that would result in allowing marriage equality in california because it would affirm the district court but it would not have any general applicability. >> we will be watching, mr. boies. thank you for being here. we're going to take a break. more from our roundtable as we get reaction to the gun debate that you've heard here this [ male announcer ] this is kevin. to prove to you that aleve is the better choice for him, he's agreed to give it up. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll be with him all day as he goes back to taking tylenol. i was okay, but after lunch my knee started to hurt again. and
're right the mental health system needs to be fixed. the civil commitment laws are in a mess. every police officer knows that. we can't even, as i said before, i've been working for 20 years to get those adjudicated, mentally incompetent and dangerous, into the national check system. we're still trying to get that done, and we need enforcement of the federal gun laws. we want to do the real things that make people safe. i mean, what's appalled me about this whole debate is how little it's had to do with making people safe and how much it has to do with the decade agenda to attack the second amendment. >> bottom line. will president obama sign a new set of gun control measures? >> i hope we end up signing something that updates the system and gets those mentally incompetent and adjudicated into the system. we forced the administration somehow to enforce the federal gun laws. i know they don't want to do it but they ought to do it. it's their responsibility. that would make people safe. put programs like project exile in every american city where if you're a drug dealer, a gang member, or a
're meddling. if we stay back, they say why aren't you standing up for civil rights. >> guest: absolutely. and i think that is the fate of a superpower, right? it is a catch 22. people want you to deliver for them, but they don't necessarily want to give you what it takes to deliver for others. so it's all about your own, your own interests. and, um, i do quote the this official who say we're kind of damned if we do, damned if we don't. and, you know, the pendulum swings constantly. it's a cyclical thing. look at syria now. people are very, very upset in syria and in the region to some extent and here in the u.s. you listen to senator john mccain, very upset that the u.s. isn't intervening, isn't doing something. there was, you know, perhaps as much upset when the u.s. decided to go to war in iraq. now there's upset because of inaction, and, you know, under the bush administration there was upset because of action. so it's a struggle to find that fine line. >> host: i think it's break time. [laughter] >> guest: great. >> on the go? "after words" is available via podcast. visit booktv.org
of post civil rights era generation. to talk about that experience, related to the palestinians and appeal to young israelis, that's the broader message here. >> yes, i think we're a long way from cairo, you know. i think what president obama and his people and his staff understood that in israel, you have to touch the public opinion. and then the leaders especially been minimum n benjamin netanyahu will follow. this man walked back from lots of principles just to get the soldier back. netanyahu was very, very attuned to the public opinion. so i think they understood they have to grasp the young generation, the people of israel. i think president obama did that from the very first moment he stepped down in israel. you know he was off that plane, he took off his jacket, he was informal. he hugged every kid he saw on the way. he first he took netanyahu, he talked about you know his wife, his late brother. his kids. and today he took the israeli public. but you know, i'm not sure because i was listening to that speech and i was asking myself, was it the caring parent giving a pep talk to his
, would we have allowed mississippi in 1960 to determine the civil rights of african-americans? i think the answer is absolutely not. i don't want any state telling me yes or no. i want the federals telling them to say yes. >> thank you both. >>> next, the new green giant. dylan ratigan gives back to the community and america's bravest. stay with us. [ male announcer ] rocky had no idea why dawn was gone for so long... ...but he'd wait for her forever, for any reason, and wod always be there with the biggest welcome home. for a love this strong, dawn only feeds him iams. compared to other leading brands, it has 50% more animal protein. ...to help keep rocky's body as strong as a love that never fades... if he ever lets her leave again. iams. keep love strong. bring your own lettuce. byol. and we'll dress it up with grilled chicken. crunchy veggies. fruits, dressings and crispy noodles. new lean cuisine salad additions. just byol. find us in frozen. earning loads of points. we'll leave that there. you got a weather balloon, with points? yes i did. [ man ] points i could use for just abou
the civil rights movement and because of the history of america and because he said several crucial phrases, essentially said that israel will never go away. so he sort of laid out the honey, then he went and gave the vinegar line saying you have to actually now do a few things you don't like, and here they are. he did a good job from the israeli critics' perspective. >> the palestinians aren't happy, the disproportionate amount of time in israel and what he asked of the two leaders, made no public demand of netanyahu yet in israel he talked about the settlement issue. it is different than four years ago, on the arab street, including ra mal a, thought it would be different. now the israelis think we understand each other better here. >> one thing the president succeeded doing, strategically very important, john, the president set up a phone call between the prime minister of israel and the leader of turkey, the prime minister, and they both agreed turkey, a nate oh ally, israel a close ally, they were going to try to normalize the relationship. it is important for the region and the u.s. a
-- is keeping the draft some of the civil-rights movement and people were briefly joining martin mr. king was assassinated april of 68 and just after i graduated kennedy was assassinated that had a huge impact on me. instead as the good quality of law in london if you could write fast and giveback accurately you did well but in a harvard they would change the goalpost and that was interesting because it encouraged sinking but most of all but struck me which was so different from the ireland i have left was young people making a difference favor deciding we could make a change and use things and we are going to bring on our own perspective so i came back to ireland in 1968 to practice and teach lot and as mine has been to be said i was in view was something he recognized as harvard humility. that led me the following year to question why it was those who were traditionally elected to the six universities scenes with elderly male professors, why was that? my friend said if you do want to go forward we will campaign with you. i was elected to the senate at the age of 25 that means i was prac
, you're framing it as a new class of people. >> it's a straight up civil rights case. >> we will see. many thanks. howard dean, we appreciate it. kelly ann conway, as always. up next, financial markets frowned on today's last minute cyprus bank bailout or deposit or bail-in. i say it's the right policy. does it spell more trouble for the euro zone? has a similar depositor crisis already happened here in the usa? >>> cyprus clinched a last-minute deal to resolve the country's financial crisis. cnbc's international correspondent michelle caruso-cabrera joins us from cyprus with the very latest. good evening, michelle. >> reporter: cyprus finally secured a bailout agreement, but it's a tough one. in exchange for the money, they agreed to downsize their two biggest banks, which means thousands of job losses and a big hit to the economy. in terms of bailouts, big firsts here. bond holders and uninsured depositors will face losses. that hasn't happened before. now investors are on notice. they're going to have to be a lot more careful. the european taxpayer isn't going to protect you like
's an astounding thing. never in the history of any civil rights movement have we come so far so fast. and, i would say, even if we achieve full marriage equality and all of the other equal status of citizenship in this country, there would be work to be done. let's remember that when we got the jim crow laws off of the books in the signatures for african-americans, it didn't mean the end of racism. and there will still be anti-gay feeling and sentiment in the country that will need to be worked on. but getting the laws in order, that is an important step forward. >> these are all signs of just about every sector of the economy, young people, older people? >> that's right. >> businesses, you know academics, whatever action recognizing that this is an issue whose time has come. right? >> that's right. we've got, i think it's 81% of young people. >> 81%. >> favors same-sex marriage. you know, it's interesting, too, if the republican party is interested in appealing to them young people do not want to be associated with any group, whether it be a religious group
general for the civil rights division right now. he spent a lot of time in his career focusing on consumer rights and protection as well. if he is confirmed, the process that takes place after the official no announcement he will be only latino in the president's cabinet. they need to get americans back to work as labor secretary and what kind of role considering his background mr. perez might play in immigration reform and what type of employment policies could be put in place if there is some overarching immigration reform. we'll keep you posted on the announcement. as we hear more we'll bring that to you. jon: it was ten years ago that operation iraqi freedom launched. our own rick leventhal was embedded with the troops who fired the first historic shots. he will be here with a former commander of that battalion to reflect on the decade past. >>> were we all wrong about the wright brothers? why an aviation historian says they were not the first men to fly. who was? we'll talk to him next. hey, our salads. [ bop ] [ bop ] [ bop ] you can do that all you want, i don't like v8 juice. [ mal
it comes to human rights, civil rights, and equality, i don't believe we should have the left versus right. these are moral issues. these are issues that go to the heart of what human beings, who we are and what we should be about not toward the partisan politics but like everything else it's going to get played out in a partisan atmosphere but i would hope we respect the individual people who through no fault of their own just are trying to live their lives and not be tortured or be subjected to these type of conversion therapies. >> donna and ari flish, thanks very much. just ahead, did the u.s. secret service accidently fire a weapon near iran's president when he was in new york? and why would iran keep quiet about something like that? stand by. if youthen this willbrids arbe a nice surprise. meet the 5-passenger ford c-max hybrid. c-max come. c-max go. c-max give a ride to everyone it knows. c max has more passenger volume than competitor prius v and we haven't even mentioned... c-max also gets better mpg. say hi to the super fuel efficient ford c-max hybrid. [ babies crying ] surprise
he is saying is in america we don't do separate but equal. that's what the civil rights movement was about. go ahead. >> this is what i would say in response to that. when you turn gay marriage into anyone that is against it, as now you're somehow the equivalent of the civil rights movement and/or being like a racist, i think that is -- >> people didn't agree with interracial marriage. people didn't think black people should vote. people didn't think women should vote. does that make it right? should you respect that viewpoint? >> don, don, don, do you honestly believe -- let me answer this question. don, do you honestly believe i don't like you as a person because you happen to have a different lifestyle than i do? >> i never even -- it never even crossed my mind. >> that's my point, though. that's my point. that is exactly -- >> you don't want him to have the same protections under the law. >> no, i don't. i want him to have civil unions -- >> hang on. hold on. go ahead. >> i have one -- can't you personally be against gay marriage and just personally, but not, you know, be aga
engage, a large part of the population wouldn't engage with civil rights. then they said we have to find a way to do this. there's no reason why immigration reform and rand paul says hispanics are natural republicans which they used to say that about black people too. lost of people in america have faith in family and are not republicans. republicans should be natural to immigration reform. many depends on what kind of immigration reform. they could favor immigration reform that brings in large number of people driving down the wage rate who don't become citizens for an awfully long time and stop the hugest big government project i can think of which is building a useless wall between america and mexico. there's nothing conservative actually about the immigration, the nature of the immigration conversation. >> congressman i want you to respond to that. i want to talk about the devil in the details. where we are in the house and counter pose to where we are on guns right after we take a break. u can't go wrong loving i. vo: from the classic lines u can't go wrong loving i. to the elegant
told him in private, he favored gay rights and went as far as saying he didn't oppose gay civil unions. >> translator: he told me that he understand that homosexual people should have their rights protected in society. he also said he believed that argentina was not ready for a gay marriage law, but said he would favor a law granting civil unions. >> reporter: he said the meeting happened after he sent this letter on behalf of gay catholics supporting the same-sex marriage bill. "the new york times" reported wednesday at a private meeting of bishops, also in 2010, cardinal bergoglio advocated that the church support civil unions for gay couples. the roman catholic church could neither confirm nor deny the report at this point. while pope francis may have expressed such view while he was a cardinal, he should be given time to develop policy position as pontiff. >> rafael romo, cnn atlanta. >> let's bring in cnn contributor, father edward beck. you heard what he said in that piece. it looks as though in bun oss aries maya buenos aries there was a softer position. how will this indicate h
says he thinks his side will win and it won't be close since he says, marriage is a civil right. >> we are not asking for a new constitutional right. the constitutional right to marry is well established. in fact, the supreme court has ruled you can't take away the right to marry, even from imprisoned felons who can't have procreation because they can't get together. but you can't take it away because it's so important, it's a fundamental right of liberty. >> there could be fireworks. there won't be cameras present, but we will get same-day audios to hear how everything goes down. >> it's always interesting. because we get the transcripts fwowrks hear the inflection and the voice, always interesting, so, we will have it. >> yes, we will. >> in the next hour, we will have a fair and balanced debate with two key players in the same cases. the head of the national organization for marriage and the national campaign director for the freedom to marry. where do you stand on the two same-sex marriage cases? tweet us your answers. we will read your responses, later on in this show. they came t
the civil rights movement live saturday at 8 p.m. eastern, part of booktv this weekend on c-span 2. difference striking between what is happening today and 100 years ago is the columnist of the parade. 100 years ago, the parade was not a parade, so much as a riot. the police refuse to protect the marchers. as they progressed, the crowds got larger and larger. they were very unruly. they had been drinking. they started to throw things at the women. they shouted and told them to go home. not just that, streetcars continued to him see people into the packed crowd the crowd got larger and larger and more aggressive. the women could not go forward. the police were not involved. the secretary of defense called out the calvary to push back the unruly crowd so that the women could continue their peaceful exercise of their first amendment rights. today, this is a wonderful peaceful assembly and as a liberation of how far have come in 100 years. >> this weekend, a look at the centennial celebration of the women's suffrage parade that took place on pittsylvania avenue in march, 1913 sunday at
will be there and warren beatty, bay area scientist gregory baitsman civil rights activist deloweros. >>> twitter has been granted a new patent for twitter. the u.s. patent says it is unique because it's independent of devices. that could cause legal confusion for anyone providing similar services but twitter has already said it will only use the patent defensively. so far there's no reaction from other companies like facebook. fans of hostest, twinkies and ding dogs could see the treats back on the shelves this summer. two investment firms are paying $2.5 million for the brand name, recipes and five factories. it's up to the new owners to decide if they will hire bark the former hostess workers. >>> some of the biggest grocery store chains will encourage their customers to eat more fish. they will announce they will not sell a certain type of salmon engineered by a biotechnology company. they are doing this as the fda gets ready to approve the sale of that modified salmon. >>> police say a bay area teenager got burned playing with fire. how his injury is tied to a truck case. the businesses that were tar
for liberty and human dignity. a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations, this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution, while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me, personally, growing up in far-flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a home. of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom, expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth, we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle, just like previous generations. it mean us working, through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed, i may not get there with you, but i want you to know that we as a people will get to the promised land. so just as joshua carried on after moses, the work goes on for all of you, the joshua generation. for justice and dignity, for opportu
fraud or fraud on wall street or public corruption or civil rights abuse. we need to make certain we are focused on the greatest revenue -- on the greatest american public. that really is in hansard are supporters of the -- in the hands of the prosecutors at the department of justice. >> what we are going to do is we are going to introduce the bill after -- and i am going to ask to your comments -- after the recess. it will be the bipartisan two of us. to set up a national commission made up of mainly prison experts, particularly in the states, many of them very conservative states. they have had to respond to the prison crowding more from an economic issue than any other. it will be bipartisan. ofare looking for a chairman stature who can come and take a year to report. i think our present system is dysfunctional and i sense there are very few people working the prisons. industry has been decimated because of congress. we tried to get prisons to adopt programs to allow them to make products that are no longer made in the united states. there are only two baseball cap manufacturers i
young voters see these meters as some of the civil rights issues of our time. >> that is certainly true but this report didn't provide a clear direction for the republican party nor a clear analysis of what specifically went wrong. there was not a clear agenda to revitalize the economy and economic growth and fix an economy that is wobbly. the only real difference that the, at cpac was pat caddell who spoke truth to power about what would be in the report and what the republicans are doing. >> let me say something about what pat said because he will not toot his own horn but he was the only speaker whose speech has not been posted online by the guys that run cpac. >> i watched it online today. >> it has gone viral. >> that is the not the official version and the reason is what pat said a week ago friday. >> what was the message? >> the problem with the autopsy, which, by the way, is...this was what the jerusalem post said in a scandal newsreel, all are guilty but none are responsible. we have no message. meanwhile there was no explanation of the strategic failures, the real tactical fai
gregory baitsman civil rights activist deloweros. >>> twitter has been granted a new patent for twitter. the u.s. patent says it is unique because it's independent of devices. that could cause legal confusion for anyone providing similar services but twitter has already said it will only use the patent defensively. so far there's no reaction from other companies like facebook. fans of hostest, twinkies and ding dogs could see the treats back on the shelves this summer. two investment firms are paying $2.5 million for the brand name, recipes and five factories. it's up to the new owners to decide if they will hire bark the former hostess workers. >>> some of the biggest grocery store chains will encourage their customers to eat more fish. they will announce they will not sell a certain type of salmon engineered by a biotechnology company. they are doing this as the fda gets ready to approve the sale of that modified salmon. >>> police say a bay area teenager got burned playing with fire. how his injury is tied to a truck case. the busines
predicting that promise for everybody because of his life. as a civil rights attorney rightsan aide senator ted kennedy, a member of montgomery county's county council, he has helped level playing field where working families can get ahead. this is not chosen -- this is not the first time he was chosen to be a labor secretary. we have governor martin o'malley, and martin appointed, as the secretary of maryland's labor department, where heat implemented the first living wage law. le, he has open pathways for everyone willing to contribute, including people with disabilities withlbgt americans, and immigrants. while he has tackled plenty of tough issues, tom has spent a career as a consensus builder. he has worked with federal, state, and local government levels, and he understands our economy works best when the middle class and those working to get into the middle class have security they need on the job, a democratic voice in the workplace, everybody playing by the same set of word -- rules strict he will make an outstanding secretary of labor, and there are plenty of work to do. we will h
. this is not democracy. this is not freedom. >> right. >> what is it? >> what it is is first of all we set this thing up to where we supported the shiites and the sunnis are now -- there is going to be a version of a civil war. right now, as we speak here live on cnn there is an alternate reality on another network. they are over there today saying how great it is. iraq's free. >> you mean fox. >> yes. i don't really want to, you know, disparage. >> let me read this tweet from donald rumsfeld. the iraqis deserve our respect and appreciation. >> he's a war criminal as far as i'm concerned. i don't understand why he, bush, cheney are walking the streets. the way they are trying to revise history saying it was a mistake or we were given bad information. say nobody sent me an e-mail or a tweet that said goldman sachs downtown right now in their basement they havethey are holding them there. i tell the police this. what will happen to me when they go down to goldman sachs and find no kids many n the basement? of course, you would think i would want to go after goldman sachs as bush wanted to go after saddam.
and the sewnries -- now there's going to be a version of a civil war. right now as we speak here live on cnn, there's an alternate reality taking place on another network, and they are over there today saying how great it is. iraq's free. >> you mean fox. >> i don't really want to disparage them by name. >> donald rumsfeld, ten years ago, became long difficult work, all who played a role in history deserve our respect and appreciation. >> well, he's a war criminal as far as i'm concerned. i don't understand why he, bush, cheney, wolfowitz are still walking the street. the way they are trying to revise history now is by saying, well, it was a mistake or we were given bad information. you know, let's say somebody sent a tweet to us right now or sent me an e-mail that said goldman sachs downtown right now in their basement, they have kidnapped children, and they are holding them there, and i then tell the police this. what will happen to me when they go down to goldman sachs and find out that there's actually no kids kidnapped in the basement of goldman sachs, and, of course, you would think i would w
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